Raptors up close at Woodchuck Lodge

  • John Burroughs Woodchuck Lodge 1633 Burroughs Memorial Rd. Roxbury, NY 12474

Raptors up close at Woodchuck Lodge

 Wild Saturday at John Burroughs’ Woodchuck Lodge, 1633 Burroughs Memorial Rd., Roxbury, on October 3 will feature wildlife rehabilitator Annie Mardiney and several birds of prey.

The 1 p.m program is free; donations are, of course, most welcome.

This is the last Wild Saturday event of the season at the Lodge, which will be open for tours from 11 to 1 and 2 to 3 Saturday. Tours will be offered for the final time this year on Sunday, Oct. 4 from 11 to 3.

Annie Mardiney, a NYS wildlife rehabilitator since 2007, lives in Rosendale. She will bring a great horned owl, barred owl, barn owl, screech owl, American kestrel, red tailed hawk and a broad-winged hawk. Mardiney will field questions about the birds’ habitat and behavior, and other topics, including the legal status of “pest” species such as Canada geese, mute swans, house sparrows, starlings and rock pigeons.

She will talk about common reasons wild birds need a rehabber, why human intervention is often unnecessary, and ways we can prevent further damage to native wild birds.

A Federal Fish & Wildlife Migratory Bird Rehabilitator since 2008, Mardiney holds state and federal permits to possess live birds for education. She takes in 300 to 500 wild birds and mammals each year, and successfully release 60 percent of them back to the wild.

John Burroughs’ beloved front porch will be an appropriate venue for this presentation, as Burroughs was known as “John o’ Birds” for his skilled observation and detailed descriptions of common winged visitors to his homes in Roxbury and in the Hudson Valley. The noted literary naturalist spent the last ten summers of his life, 1910-20, at Woodchuck Lodge, the rustic farmhouse built by his brother Curtis about 1862.

Books, notecards and the new “Afloat and Afoot” audiobook, can be purchased at the Lodge shop.

Visitors are encouraged to stop at nearby John Burroughs Memorial Field State Historic Site where Burroughs is buried in a former cow pasture on his boyhood farm.

For more information on John Burroughs and Woodchuck Lodge, a national historic site maintained by a State-chartered non-profit organization, visit www.woodchucklodge.org.